Category Archives: Annual Lectures

CMEMLL/ILCR Annual Lecture: Steve White (Emory) & Gadi Algazi (Tel Aviv)

‘Boy meets Gift: or, The Uses of Literature’

Monday 18 April, 5.15 – 7.00 pm
Parliament Hall, South Street

This lecture, given collaboratively by Professor Stephen D. White (Emory) and Professor Gadi Algazi (Tel Aviv) is a joint venture of CMEMLL and the Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research. This year, the CMEMLL Annual Lecture is also the ILCR Annual Academic Lecture.

A wine reception will follow the event.

All welcome.


Stephen D. White is Asa G. Candler Professor Emeritus of Medieval History at Emory University.

He is author of Custom, Kinship, and Gifts to Saints: the Laudatio Parentum in Western France, 1050-1150Sir Edward Coke and the Grievances of the Commonwealth, 1621-1628Feuding and Peacemaking in Eleventh-Century France; and Re-Thinking Kinship and Feudalism in Early Medieval Europe.

He is currently completing a collection of essays on treason, vengeance and feuding in eleventh- and twelfth-century France and England; and a book manuscript provisionally entitled, ‘Bad Kings, Felonious Barons, and Unfaithful Ladies: The Representation of Treason Trials in Old French Literature, c.1150 to c.1240.’


Gadi Algazi is Professor of History at the Department of History, Tel Aviv University, and senior editor of the journal History & Memory. He is also member of the editorial board of the journals Past & Present and Historische Anthropologie.

He is author of Herrengewalt und Gewalt der Herren im späten Mittelalter: Herrschaft, Gegenseitigkeit und Sprachgebrauch [Historische Studien, vol. 17] (Frankfurt am Main/New York: Campus, 1996) [Seigniorial Power and Violence in the Later Middle Ages: Lordship, Reciprocity and Language Use] and, with Valentin Groebner and Bernhard Jussen, he coedited Negotiating the Gift: Pre-Modern Figurations of Exchange (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2003).

He is currently completing a book on the shaping of scholars’ way of life and habitus between 1480 and 1630.

CMEMLL Annual Report 2014/15

CMEMLL Annual Report 2015/16

We are pleased to share a report of CMEMLL’s activities for the academic year 2014/15 here.

As you can see, we were rather busy last year with three conferences, a regular programme of reading groups and research events, and the inauguration of the new Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research.

We are half-way through our programme for 2015/16 with a great deal to look forward to in second semester.

See the programme of events and the Annual Report for further details.

 

CMEMLL Annual Lecture: Professor Sir John Baker (University of Cambridge)

‘Magna Carta – Statute or Myth?’

Thursday 2 April, 2015, 5.15 pm
School III, St Salvator’s Quadrangle

Sir John Baker, Downing Professor Emeritus of the Laws of England at St Catharine’s College, University of Cambridge, will give a paper entitled ‘Magna Carta – Statute or Myth?’.

2014-15 - John Baker

Abstract

Magna Carta has had an immense influence on hearts and minds, and even events, over the last eight hundred years. Yet it is not always understood that this has been achieved more by magic than by operation of positive law. Much of the text was obsolete or obsolescent five hundred years ago, and what remained was difficult even for the lawyers of those days to interpret. In any case, no remedies were provided for private subjects in case the words were not observed by the king. The lecture will address some of these legal difficulties and outline how and when they were overcome.


Professor Sir Baker’s research interests include English legal history, especially in the early-modern period; history of the legal profession and the Inns of Court; and manuscript law reports and readings.  Alongside his academic career, he is a Barrister at both the Inner Temple and Gray’s Inn, and an Honorary Bencher at the Inner Temple.

His substantial list of publications most notably includes the Oxford History of the Laws of England, Volume VI: 1483-1558 (2003) and the frequently reprinted Introduction to English Legal History (1st ed. 1971, 2nd ed. 1979, 3rd ed. 1990, and 4th ed. 2002).  However, he has also published extensively on the Inns of Court, including Readings and Moots at the Inns of Court in the Fifteenth Century (2000) and most recently The Men of Court 1440 to 1550: A Prosopography of the Inns of Court and Chancery and the Courts of Law (2012).  He has further edited numerous collections of manuscripts and reports, including The Reports of Sir John Spelman  (1977), The Reports of William Dalison, 1552-1558 (2007), and Reports from the Time of Henry VIII (2003–04).

The lecture will be followed by a wine reception in the Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English.

All welcome.

CMEMLL Annual Lecture: Professor Christopher Brooks (University of Durham)

‘Paradise lost? Law, literature, and history in Restoration England’

Wednesday 9 October, 2013, 5.15 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English 

Christopher Brooks, Professor of Legal History at the University of Durham, will give a paper entitled ‘Paradise lost? Law, literature, and history in Restoration England’.

Prompted by the relative lack of ‘law and literature’ studies devoted to the second half of the seventeenth century, the lecture starts with a consideration of the relationship between ‘law and literature’ and legal history in the century between 1550 and 1640. It then looks at some of the significant transformations in legal life from 1640 through the Restoration period, and asks how literature (broadly defined) might help us better understand them.


Professor Brooks has wide-ranging research interests in the history of early-modern England, with a particular focus on the law and its social and cultural implications. His publications include Law, Politics and Society in Early Modern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009), and he is currently preparing the 1625-1689 volume of the Oxford History of the Laws of England.