Events

Semester 1, 2016-17


Coming Soon


Semester 2, 2016-17


Coming Soon


Semester 2, 2015-16


ILCR/CMEMLL Reading Group

‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution’ (iv)

Anthony Lang on China Mieville

Tuesday 16 February, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History


ILCR/CMEMLL Reading Group

‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution’ (v)

Knud Haakonssen on Adam Smith and Natural Law

Tuesday 8 March, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History


CMEMLL Postgraduate and Early Career Masterclass

Todd Butler (Washington State)

Monday 28 March, 4.00 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English


CMEMLL Research Lecture

Todd Butler (Washington State)

Tuesday 29 March, 5.15 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English


CMEMLL Conference

Dare to Tell: Silence and Saying in Ben Jonson

Friday 1 – Sunday 3 April
Kennedy Hall, School of English


 ILCR/CMEMLL Annual Academic Lecture

Gadi Algazi (Tel Aviv) and Steve White (Emory)

‘Doing Law and Literature’

Monday 18 April, 5.15 pm
Parliament Hall


ILCR/CMEMLL Reading Group

‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution’ (vi)

Lorna Hutson and John Hudson: Conclusions

Tuesday 19 April, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History


CMEMLL Conference

Gender & Transgression in the Middle Ages

Tuesday 26 – Thursday 28 April
St John’s House, 71 South St, School of History


ILCR/CMEMLL Academic Roundtable

‘Drama and Law’

Thursday 5 May, 1-4pm
Lawson Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Participants: Lorna Hutson (St Andrews), Quentin Skinner (QMUL), & Andrew Zurcher (Cambridge)


Semester 1, 2015-16


CMEMLL/SAIMS Research Seminar

Sara Menzinger (Università degli Studi Roma Tre)

‘Dante, the Bible and the Law: On the Trail of Uzzah in Medieval Legal-Theological Thought’

Monday 28 September, 5.15 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History

Organised jointly with the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies (SAIMS)


CMEMLL Research Reading Group

Sara Menzinger (Università degli Studi Roma Tre)

‘Property and Citizenship in Medieval Legal Debate’

Tuesday 29 September, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History


ILCR/CMEMLL Reading Group

‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution’ (i): Introductory Meeting

Reading: Christopher N. Warren, Literature and the Law of Nations, 1580-1680 (Oxford, 2015). Chapter 1, “The Stakes of International Law and Literature”

Tuesday 6 October, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History


ILCR/CMEMLL Reading Group

‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution’ (ii)

Reading: Christopher N. Warren, Literature and the Law of Nations, 1580-1680 (Oxford, 2015). Chapter 5, “From Imperial History to International Law”

Tuesday 17 November, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History


ILCR/CMEMLL Reading Group

‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution’ (iii)

Reading: Christopher N. Warren, Literature and the Law of Nations, 1580-1680 (Oxford, 2015). Chapter 6, “From Biblical Tragedy to Human Rights”

Tuesday 15 December, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History


Semester 2, 2014-15


CMEMLL Research Seminar

Professor Lorna Hutson (University of St Andrews)

‘Circumstantial Shakespeare

Wednesday 3 June, 2.00 – 3.30 pm
Watson Seminar Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English 

For a joint event between the Centre for Mediaeval and Early Modern Law and Literature and The Early Modern Society, Lorna Hutson, Berry Professor of English at the University of St Andrews, will lead a seminar on her most recent book Circumstantial Shakespeare.

Lorna’s interests are in the rhetorical bases of Renaissance literature, and in the relationship between literary form and the formal aspects of non-literary culture. Recent work includes the delivery of the Oxford Wells Shakespeare Lectures, 2012, on ‘Circumstantial Shakespeare’, the editing of Ben Jonson’s Discoveries (1641) for the Cambridge Complete Works of Ben Jonson (2012) and The Invention of Suspicion: Law and Mimesis in Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama (OUP, 2007, pbk 2011), which won the Roland Bainton Prize for Literature in 2008. She is currently working, with Bradin Cormack, on the Oxford Handbook of English Law and Literature, 1500-1700, and directs CMEMLL, the Centre for Mediaeval and Early Modern Law and Literature.


CMEMLL Conference

Emotions in the Courtroom

3-4 May 2015
St John’s House, School of History

The recent surge of interest in the history of emotions has seen medievalists uncover a broad range of new source material recording the affective lives of Europeans in the Middle Ages. A parallel growth of interest in crime and judicial records from ecclesiastical and secular courts has identified these as excellent sources and made clear that the courtroom could be a locus for emotionally charged events. This one and a half day interdisciplinary symposium brings together scholars of law, literature and history to examine the role that emotions played in legal conduct and procedure.

Keynote Speaker: Stephen D White (Emory/Harvard University)

Convenors: Kimberley-Joy Knight (CHE, The University of Sydney); Jamie Page (Durham University); John Hudson (University of St Andrews)

The symposium is free of charge but pre-booking is required before 25th April, 2015. For pre-booking and information, contact:

kimberley.knight@sydney.edu.au


CMEMLL Conference

The English Legal Imaginary, 1500-1700, Parts I and II

Part I: Princeton University, 17-18 April, 2015

Part II: University of St Andrews, 1-2 May, 2015

 The English Legal Imaginary Part I The English Legal Imaginary, Part II

CMEMLL is delighted to announce The English Legal Imaginary, Part II, taking place in the School of English on 1-2 May, 2015. The English Legal Imaginary, Part II is an interdisciplinary conference involving leading scholars working at the intersections of law, politics, literature and history in early modern England. The conference papers will contribute to the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of English Law and Literature, 1500-1700. Topics include: Roman law and common law, law and drama; law and education; equity, legal reform and literary censorship.

Speakers include: Martin Butler, Bradin Cormack, Alan Cromartie, Steve Hindle; Rab Houston, Lorna Hutson, David Ibbetson, James McBain, Subha Mukherji, Joad Raymond, Carolyn Sale, James Sharpe, Erica Sheen, Quentin Skinner, Virginia Lee Strain, Elliott Visconsi, Ian Williams, Jessica Winston, and Andrew Zurcher.

The registration fees for this conference are: £30 for students and unwaged, and £40 for waged participants. This fee covers lunch and coffee/tea breaks on both days, in addition to the conference dinner on Friday 1, and the closing wine and cheese reception on Saturday 2 May.


CMEMLL Annual Lecture

Professor Sir John Baker (University of Cambridge) – ‘Magna Carta – Statute or Myth?’

Thursday 2 April, 2015, 5.15 pm
School III, St Salvator’s Quadrangle

Sir John Baker, Downing Professor Emeritus of the Laws of England at St Catharine’s College, University of Cambridge, will give a paper entitled ‘Magna Carta – Statute or Myth?’.

Professor Sir Baker’s research interests include English legal history, especially in the early-modern period; history of the legal profession and the Inns of Court; and manuscript law reports and readings.  Alongside his academic career, he is a Barrister at both the Inner Temple and Gray’s Inn, and an Honorary Bencher at the Inner Temple.

His substantial list of publications most notably includes the Oxford History of the Laws of England, Volume VI: 1483-1558 (2003) and the frequently reprinted Introduction to English Legal History (1st ed. 1971, 2nd ed. 1979, 3rd ed. 1990, and 4th ed. 2002).  However, he has also published extensively on the Inns of Court, including Readings and Moots at the Inns of Court in the Fifteenth Century (2000) and most recently The Men of Court 1440 to 1550: A Prosopography of the Inns of Court and Chancery and the Courts of Law (2012).  He has further edited numerous collections of manuscripts and reports, including The Reports of Sir John Spelman  (1977), The Reports of William Dalison, 1552-1558 (2007), and Reports from the Time of Henry VIII (2003–04).

The lecture will be followed by a wine reception.


Tuesday 21 April – No Reading Group


CMEMLL Research Lecture

Professor Paul Raffield (University of Warwick) – ‘Men of Violence, Men of Vision: John Davies and John Marston of the Middle Temple’

Wednesday 11 March, 2015, 5.15 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English 

Paul Raffield, Professor of Law at the University of Warwick, will give a paper entitled ‘Men of Violence, Men of Vision: John Davies and John Marston of the Middle Temple’.

Professor Raffield’s research interests include legal history, law and literature, and critical legal studies, and he has published extensively on theatre and the law, with a particular emphasis on Shakespeare. To a considerable degree, his research interests derive from his career as an actor and director, for 25 years prior to his appointment at Warwick. He was the co-organiser of a major international conference on Shakespeare and the Law, hosted by The University of Warwick in 2007: see P. Raffield and G. Watt (eds.), Shakespeare and the Law (Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2008).

His other publications include Images and Cultures of Law in Early Modern England: Justice and Political Power, 1558-1660 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), and his most recent sole-authored monograph, Shakespeare’s Imaginary Constitution: Late-Elizabethan Politics and the Theatre of Law (Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2010). This latter volume was nominated for the 2011 Inner Temple Book Prize, awarded every 3 years for a book which has made a profound contribution to the understanding of law in the United Kingdom.  He is also the founding co-editor of Law and Humanities, published by Hart Journals.


CMEMLL Reading Group

Alibis of Empire – Professor John Hudson (University of St Andrews)

Tuesday 17 February, 2015, 1-2 pm
Garden Seminar Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English 

John Hudson, Professor of Legal History at the University of St Andrews, will lead a reading group on Karuna Mantena’s Alibis of Empire: Henry Maine and the Ends of Liberal Imperialism (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010).

Professor Hudson’s research interests began with law and land-holding in twelfth-century England, and this subject has remained central to much of his subsequent work, leading up to his recent volume of The Oxford History of the Laws of England, 871-1216 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).  Some of his legal history work plays with the applicability to mediaeval situations of ideas from modern legal theory; this work is furthered by his visiting association with the University of Michigan Law School, where he enjoys the title of William W. Cook Global Law Professor. He has two other main areas of research interest –  one is mediaeval historical writing, mostly in England, and the other is nineteenth-century writing on the Middle Ages, and in particular the work of the greatest of legal historians, F. W. Maitland.


CMEMLL Reading Group

Justice for Hedgehogs – Zoë Sutherland (University of St Andrews)

Tuesday 3 February, 2015, 1-2 pm
Garden Seminar Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English 

Zoë Sutherland, Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of St Andrews, will lead a reading group on Ronald Dworkin’s Justice for Hedgehogs.

Zoë graduated in English from the University of St Andrews in 2009 and went on to study Law as a Queen Mother’s Scholar at the Middle Temple. She later specialised in human rights law, gaining an LLM with Distinction from Queen Mary, University of London. In her previous work, while focusing on the jurisprudence of human dignity and the rise of ‘religitigation’ case law (Christian freedom of religion v LGBT equality), Zoë has drawn on Dworkin’s (arguably flawed) interpretative theory of ‘judgemental responsibility’ to demonstrate that dignity potentially reifies balancing exercises in human rights judgements, which are too often found to abrogate from either freedom or equality. Zoë also contributed to the amicus brief submitted by the International Commission of Jurists in Ladele & McFarlane v UK (Application nos. 51671/10 and 36516/10) and provided research assistance to Jill Marshall in writing Human Rights Law and Personal Identity. Abingdon, New York: Routledge, 2014.  She is now a Ph.D. candidate in the School of English, supervised by Lorna Hutson, and is working on a thesis on self-given law in Ben Jonson.


CMEMLL Reading Group

Early Career and Postgraduate Research – Cory Hitt, Julianne Mentzer, Sarah White

Tuesday 27 January, 2015, 1-2 pm
Garden Seminar Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English 

Cory Hitt, Julianne Mentzer, and Sarah White will each give a 5-minute presentation on their current research, which will be followed by questions and group discussion.

Cory Hitt graduated with a degree in English from the College of William & Mary in 2011. After working for two years in the aerospace and defines industry as a lobbying assistant, she came to the University of St Andrews on a Marie Curie fellowship with PIMIC (Power & Institutions in Medieval Islam & Christendom), an EU-funded International Training Network. She is in the second year of her PhD, currently working on developing models of transmission of honour codes and legal expertise within the context of Icelandic and Anglo-Norman literature under the supervision of John Hudson.

Julianne Mentzer received her BA (Hons) in English and Philosophy, and an MA (Hons) in Literary and Cultural Studies from Carnegie Mellon University.  She then relocated to Scotland, and completed her MLitt in Renaissance Studies from the University of Strathclyde.  She is now a Ph.D. candidate in the School of English, supervised by Lorna Hutson, and her thesis will explore the rhetoric of friendship and the role of flattery in early modern homosocial relationships.

Sarah White received her BA (Hons) in Medieval Studies from the University of Victoria, and her MA (Hons) in the same field from the University of Toronto.  She is now a Ph.D. candidate in Medieval History, supervised by John Hudson.  She is interested in legal arguments and equity in Church courts in England in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and her thesis is provisionally entitled ‘Process and Procedure in the thirteenth-century Court of Canterbury’.

Short excerpts of reading material may be circulated in advance of the session.


Semester 1, 2014-15


CMEMLL Reading Group

Dr Margaret Connolly (University of St Andrews)

Tuesday 16 December, 2014, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Margaret Connolly, Senior Lecturer in the School of English at the University of St Andrews, will lead a reading group entitled ‘Middle English Verse Charters of Christ’.

Dr Connolly’s research concerns later medieval English literature and its manuscript context, and she has a strong interest in book history. Of her previous publications, the most relevant in this context to mention is an essay, ‘Sixteenth-Century Readers Reading Fifteenth-Century Religious Books: The Roberts Family of Middlesex’ that has recently appeared in a volume edited by Nicole Rice, Middle English Religious Writing in Practice: Texts, Readers, and Transformations (Turnhout: Brepols, 2013).


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor Lorna Hutson and Julianne Mentzer (University of St Andrews)

Tuesday 18 November, 2014, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Lorna Hutson, Berry Professor of English Literature and Julianne Mentzer, Ewan & Christine Brown Ph.D. Scholar in the School of English, will lead a reading group on Ben Jonson’s Everyman In His Humour.  

Professor Hutson’s interests are in the rhetorical bases of Renaissance literature, and in the relationship between literary form and the formal aspects of non-literary culture.  Her recent work includes the delivery of the Oxford Wells Shakespeare Lectures, 2012, on ‘Circumstantial Shakespeare’, the editing of Ben Jonson’s Discoveries (1641) for the Cambridge Complete Works of Ben Jonson (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012) and The Invention of Suspicion: Law and Mimesis in Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007; pbk 2011), which won the Roland H. Bainton Prize for Literature in 2008.

Julianne Mentzer is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of English, supervised by Lorna Hutson. Her Ph.D. project will explore the rhetoric of friendship and the role of flattery in early modern homosocial relationships.


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor John Hudson (University of St Andrews)

Tuesday 21 October, 2014, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

John Hudson, Professor of Legal History at the University of St Andrews, will lead a reading group entitled ‘Drafting Magna Carta’.

This reading group will involve a close comparison of the famous Magna Carta of 1215 and a preceding set of demands known as The Articles of the Barons.  Drawing on these texts, we will consider issues of the minutiae of drafting, of these and other documents; the composers of the Charter; and political thought.

Professor Hudson’s research interests began with law and land-holding in twelfth-century England, and this subject has remained central to much of his subsequent work, leading up to his recent volume of The Oxford History of the Laws of England, 871-1216 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).  Some of his legal history work plays with the applicability to mediaeval situations of ideas from modern legal theory; this work is furthered by his visiting association with the University of Michigan Law School, where he enjoys the title of William W. Cook Global Law Professor. He has two other main areas of research interest –  one is mediaeval historical writing, mostly in England, and the other is nineteenth-century writing on the Middle Ages, and in particular the work of the greatest of legal historians, F. W. Maitland.


SAIMS Research Seminar

Professor Phillip Schofield (University of Aberystwyth)

Monday 13 October, 2014, 5.15 pm
Old Class Library, St John’s House, School of History

Phillipp Schofield, Professor of Mediaeval History at Aberystwyth University, will give a paper entitled ‘Litigation and the nature of proof in English manorial courts in the later thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries.’

Professor Schofield is presently undertaking a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship on the Great Famine in early fourteenth-century England.  He is also engaged in writing up AHRC-funded research on litigation on manorial courts and seals in medieval Wales, and is completing a volume for Manchester University Press on Peasants and Historians: the historiography of the medieval English peasantry. He is also co-editor of the Economic History Review.

His publications include: With R.A. Griffiths, eds., Wales and the Welsh in the Middle Ages (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2011); with Thijs Lambrecht, Credit and the rural economy in North-western Europe, c. 1200-c.1800 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2009); and Peasant and community in medieval England (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2003).


CMEMLL Reading Group

Early Career and Postgraduate Research: Dr Rachel E. Holmes, Will Eves, Doyeeta Majumder

Tuesday 16 September, 2014, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Rachel E. Holmes, Will Eves, and Doyeeta Majumder will each give a 5-minute presentation on their current research, which will be followed by questions and group discussion.

Dr Holmes is an Early Career Researcher and Assistant to the Directors of the Centre for Mediaeval and Early Modern Law and Literature (CMEMLL).  She works comparatively in law and literature, and is interested in areas of friction between secular and ecclesiastical jurisdictions in the early modern period, and related anxieties about sexual contracts.  She is currently working on a monograph proposal based on her AHRC funded Ph.D. thesis, Casos de Honra: Honouring Clandestine Contracts and Italian Novelle in Early Modern English and Spanish Drama, supervised by Professor Lorna Hutson.

Will Eves has a background in law, graduating from the University of Warwick with an LL.B (first class hons.) in 2006 and an LL.M (with distinction) in 2007. After working in an employment law firm for a short time he decided to change direction and dive into the somewhat hazier, but much more intriguing, world of medieval law. He came to St Andrews in 2011 for the M.Litt in medieval history and is now working on an AHRC funded Ph.D. thesis entitled The Assize of Mort d’Ancestor in the Late Twelfth and Early Thirteenth Centuries, supervised by Professor John Hudson.

Doyeeta Majumder obtained her B.A. (2008) and M.A. (2010) in English Literature from Jadavpur University, Calcutta, India. She started her Ph.D. entitled ‘The ‘New Prince’ and the Problem of ‘Lawmaking’ Violence in Early Modern Drama’ in September 2011, under the supervision of Professor Lorna Hutson. Her research interest lies primarily in Early Modern notions of sovereignty, tyranny and usurpation as they manifest themselves in drama and in juridico-political treatises.

Short excerpts of reading material may be circulated in advance of the session.


Semester 2, 2013-14


CMEMLL Research Lecture

Professor Bradin Cormack (Princeton University)

Thursday 15 May, 2014, 3.15 pm
Garden Seminar Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Bradin Cormack, Professor of English at Princeton University and Corresponding Professor of CMEMLL, will give a paper entitled ‘In the time of example: case thinking in Shakespearean Drama.’

As Professor Cormack explains:

‘This paper places Shakespeare’s comedies, in particular The Comedy of Errors and The Merchant of Venice, in the double context of case-jurisprudence in the sixteenth-century common law and of exemplarity in sixteenth-century historiographical writing. It suggests that Shakespeare’s comedies are marked microtextually and structurally by the consideration not only of the rhetorical impact of examples but, more basically, of what, logically, the example is such that it might constitute knowledge. I will be considering in particular the question of how examples or cases relate to time, and, in addition to Shakespeare, I will consider some passages in Sidney’s Defense, which is of course notorious for the case it makes for the case.

My talk, which will focus on Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors with some attention to Sidney, will be self-explanatory. If you would like to read something in advance, I suggest Agamben’s essay “What is a Paradigm,” which informs some of the ways in which I am thinking about example.’

Professor Cormack is author of A Power to Do Justice: Jurisdiction, English Literature, and the Rise of Common Law, 1509-1625 (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2007) and of Book Use, Book Theory, co-authored with Carla Mazzio (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Library, 2005).

He is co-editor, with Leonard Barkan and Sean Keilen, of The Forms of Renaissance Thought: New Essays on Literature and Culture (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008) and, with Richard Strier and Martha Nussbaum, of Shakespeare and the Law: A Conversation among the Disciplines and Professions (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2013).

He has published on issues of sovereignty in Shakespeare Quarterly, and he is currently working on two books, a philosophical study of Shakespeare’s sonnets and a short monograph on Shakespeare and Law.


CMEMLL Research Lecture

Professor Mark Godfrey (University of Glasgow)

Thursday 8 May, 2014, 5.15 pm
Garden Seminar Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Mark Godfrey, Professor of Law at the University of Glasgow, will give a paper entitled ‘Courts and Councils: Litigation and Jurisdiction in Late Medieval Scotland.’

Note from the speaker: “If I were to recommend one piece of background reading which would introduce the topic well it would probably be: A. M. Godfrey, ‘Parliament and the Law’, in Keith M. Brown and Alan R. Macdonald (eds.), The History of the Scottish Parliament. Volume 3: Parliament in Context 1235-1707 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2010), pp 157-185.”

Professor Mark Godfrey is author of Civil Justice in Renaissance Scotland: the Origins of a Central Court (Series: Medieval law and its practice, 4) (Leiden; Boston, MA: Brill, 2009). He is a member of the AHRC Peer Review College, and has also served on the Council of the Stair Society, the Scottish Record Society, the Editorial Board of The Records of the Parliament of Scotland to 1707, as Secretary of the Scottish Legal History Group, and in 2011-12 as National Adjudicator for the English Speaking Union / Essex Court Chambers National Mooting Competition.

Mark’s research interests are in legal history and the law of obligations. His main research field is the history of central justice, courts, jurisdiction, private law and dispute settlement in medieval and early modern Scotland. He has published extensively on the origins and development of the Court of Session, and on the foundation of the College of Justice in sixteenth-century Scotland.


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor David M. Rabban (University of Texas at Austin)

Tuesday 29 April, 2014, 1-2 pm
New Seminar Room, St John’s House, 65 South Street, School of History

David M. Rabban, the Dahr Jamail, Randall Hage Jamail and Robert Lee Jamail Regents Chair and Professor of Law at the University of Texas at Austin, author of Law’s History: American Legal Thought and the Transatlantic Turn to History (on American legal historians and medievalism), will lead a reading group on Maitland.  The reading for this session is Chapter XII of David Rabban’s book, Law’s History:

Rabban, David M., ‘Maitland: The Maturity of English Legal History,’ in Law’s History: American Legal Thought and the Transatlantic Turn to History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), pp. 383-422.

Rabban plans to touch briefly on the relationship between Maitland and the American legal historians in his talk on Monday, but wishes to discuss Maitland more broadly and in more detail in the reading group.

Professor Rabban’s research focuses on labor law, higher education and the law, and American legal history. He is best known for his path-breaking work on free speech in American history. He is the author of Free Speech in Its Forgotten Years, 1870-1920 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,1997), which received the Forkosch Prize from the Journal of the History of Ideas for “the best book in intellectual history published in 1997″. His many articles have appeared in Yale Law JournalStanford Law ReviewUniversity of Chicago Law Review, and elsewhere.


CMEMLL/SAIMS Research Seminar

Professor David M. Rabban (University of Texas at Austin)

Monday 28 April, 2014, 5.15 pm
Old Class Library, St John’s House, 65 South Street, School of History

David M. Rabban, the Dahr Jamail, Randall Hage Jamail and Robert Lee Jamail Regents Chair and Professor of Law at the University of Texas at Austin, author of Law’s History: American Legal Thought and the Transatlantic Turn to History (on American legal historians and medievalism), will give a paper entitled ‘Making Law Scientific: The Founding Generation of American Legal Scholars on Mediaeval English Law.’

Professor Rabban’s research focuses on labor law, higher education and the law, and American legal history. He is best known for his path-breaking work on free speech in American history. He is the author of Free Speech in Its Forgotten Years, 1870-1920 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,1997), which received the Forkosch Prize from the Journal of the History of Ideas for “the best book in intellectual history published in 1997″. His many articles have appeared in Yale Law JournalStanford Law ReviewUniversity of Chicago Law Review, and elsewhere.


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor Emanuele Conte (Università degli Studi Roma Tre)

Tuesday 15 April, 2014, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Emanuele Conte, Professor of Law in the Department of Jurisprudence at the Università degli Studi Roma Tre, will lead a reading group on ‘the process of isolation of the legal Science, in connection with the German historical school.’
Professor Conte laments his lack of materials on his topic in English, but suggests reading the introduction (preface) to Savigny’s The History of the Law during the Middle Ages trans. Cathcart (1829) as a starting point, accessible at Google Books.
For those of us capable of reading Italian, he suggests his paper ‘Storia interna e storia esterna: Il diritto medievale da Francesco Calasso alla fine del XX secolo’ as supplementary reading, accessible on Academia.edu.
Professor Conte’s research interests span Medieval Canon & Roman Law, European Legal History, Criminal Procedure, Law and Humanities, and Constitutional Law.  He is author of Tres Libri codicis: La ricomparsa del testo e l’esegesi scolastica prima di Accursio (Ius commune)(Frankfurt: V. Klostermann, 1990).

CMEMLL/SAIMS Research Seminar

Professor Emanuele Conte (Università degli Studi Roma Tre)

Monday 14 April, 2014, 5.15 pm
Old Class Library, St John’s House, 65 South Street, School of History

Emanuele Conte, Professor of Law in the Department of Jurisprudence at Università degli Studi Roma Tre, will lead a seminar entitled ‘Karissimo amico domino Aymerico. The turn to Roman procedure and the beginning of legal doctrines in the 12th Century.’

Professor Conte’s research interests span Medieval Canon & Roman Law, European Legal History, Criminal Procedure, Law and Humanities, and Constitutional Law.  He is author of Tres Libri codicis: La ricomparsa del testo e l’esegesi scolastica prima di Accursio (Ius commune) (Frankfurt: V. Klostermann, 1990).


SAIMS Research Seminar

Professor Phillipp Schofield (Aberystwyth University)

Monday 7 April, 2014, 5.15 pm
Old Class Library, St John’s House, 65 South Street, School of History

Phillipp Schofield, Professor of Mediaeval History at Aberystwyth University, will give a paper entitled ‘Litigation and the nature of proof in English manorial courts in the later thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries.’

Professor Schofield is presently undertaking a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship on the Great Famine in early fourteenth-century England.  He is also engaged in writing up AHRC-funded research on litigation on manorial courts and seals in medieval Wales, and is completing a volume for Manchester University Press on Peasants and Historians: the historiography of the medieval English peasantry. He is also co-editor of the Economic History Review.

His publications include: With R.A. Griffiths, eds., Wales and the Welsh in the Middle Ages (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2011); with Thijs Lambrecht, Credit and the rural economy in North-western Europe, c. 1200-c.1800 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2009); and Peasant and community in medieval England (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2003).


CMEMLL Research Lecture

Professor Colin Kidd (University of St Andrews)

Wednesday 12 March, 2014, 5.15 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Colin Kidd, Professor of History at the University of St Andrews, will give a paper entitled ‘The Trials of Douglas Young: Hitler, Aristophanes and the SNP.’

2013 saw the centenary of the birth of Douglas Young, one of the most influential figures in twentieth-century Scottish nationalism. Leader of the SNP from 1942 to the end of the War, Young was imprisoned twice for refusing conscription – both military and industrial. He was also an eminent classicist, who translated some of the plays of Aristophanes into Lallans (Lowland Scots). Colin Kidd will investigate Young’s chequered career, and examine the broader context of the curious Scottish nationalist response to the world crisis of the 1940s.’

Professor Kidd’s current research focuses on the intellectual history of the English Enlightenment and its nineteenth-century aftermath, particularly in fields such as antiquarianism, mythography and religious apologetic.

His publications include: Union and Unionisms: Political Thought in Scotland 1500-2000 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008); The Forging of Races: Race and Scripture in the Atlantic World 1600-2000 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006); and British Identities before Nationalism: Ethnicity and Nationhood in the British Atlantic World, 1600-1800 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999).


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor John Hudson and Cory Hitt (University of St Andrews)

Tuesday 11 February, 2014, 1-2 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

John Hudson, Professor of Legal History, and Cory Hitt, Marie Curie Ph.D. Fellow in the School of History will lead a reading group on Marie de France’s ‘Lanval’.  The text of Marie de France’s ‘Lanval’ can be downloaded in French and in an English translation.

Quoting John Hudson, ‘Marie de France’s Lanval is a beautifully crafted Lai (i.e. Short story) from the circle of Henry II.  Steeped in the supernatural and the erotic, it also provides fascinating material for the procedure and politics of court cases in the late twelfth century.’

Professor Hudson’s research interests began with law and land-holding in twelfth-century England, and this subject has remained central to much of his subsequent work, leading up to his recent volume of The Oxford History of the Laws of England, 871-1216 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).  Some of his legal history work plays with the applicability to mediaeval situations of ideas from modern legal theory; this work is furthered by his visiting association with the University of Michigan Law School, where he enjoys the title of William W. Cook Global Law Professor. He has two other main areas of research interest –  one is mediaeval historical writing, mostly in England, and the other is nineteenth-century writing on the Middle Ages, and in particular the work of the greatest of legal historians, F. W. Maitland.

Cory Hitt is a Ph.D. candidate in Medieval History, supervised by John Hudson. She specialises in 12th-century literature and law in France and Iceland. She is also an Early Stage Researcher with PIMIC (Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom).


Semester 1, 2013-14


CMEMLL Reading Group

Dr Jamie Page (University of St Andrews)

Thursday 5 December, 2013, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Jamie Page, recent graduate and early career researcher of the School of History, will lead a reading group entitled “Sexual Subjectivities and Medieval Court Records”.

This session will examine three legal case studies from late medieval Germany and England featuring individuals whose experience at the hands of the authorities poses questions about sexual identity, and prompts challenges about the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of past subjectivities.

Some of this unpublished material comes from Dr Page’s recently completed PhD thesis on prostitution in the later Middle Ages in which he examines the evidence for prostitution as a sexual identity in German-speaking regions.

The texts for discussion are:

  1. David Lorenzo Boyd and Ruth Mazo Karras, “Ut cum muliere”: A Male Transvestite Prostitute in Fourteenth Century London”. In Premodern Sexualities, ed. Louise Fradenburg and Carl Freccero. (London: Routledge, 1996), pp. 99-116.
  2. Helmut Puff, “Female Sodomy: The Trial of Katherina Hetzeldorfer (1477),” in Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 30:1 (2000), pp. 41-61.
  3. “Clandestine prostitution and abortion in 14th-century Zurich: A Transcription from the Archives”.  In German, but a translation will follow in the week before the reading group.

Dr Page is interested in gender, the history of sexuality, and the social history of towns in later medieval Germany and Switzerland. His primary research interests concern prostitution and brothels in medieval German-speaking regions. He is currently working on a monograph proposal based upon his Ph.D. thesis on the same topic, and on an article which reevaluates the role of brothel ordinances (Frauenhausordnungen) in the regulation of prostitution in medieval Germany.


CMEMLL Reading Group

Dr Margaret Connolly (University of St Andrews)

Thursday 14 November, 2013, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Dr Margaret Connolly, Senior Lecturer in the School of English, will lead a reading group entitled ‘A 16th Century Lawyer and his 15th Century Books’.  This topic draws from her current research on a 16th Century gentry family which is provisionally entitled: Newly Reformed Readers and their Reading: A Sixteenth-Century Family and their Medieval Books, taking one member of the family, Thomas Roberts, who was a London lawyer as the focus of the session.

The texts for discussion are:

  1. A summary of how the material relating to Thomas Roberts is like/is not like that relating to other contemporary lawyers, and which lists the contents of surviving books that may be associated with him.
  2. An article by C. E. Moreton, ‘The “Library of a Late Fifteenth-Century Lawyer’, The Library6th Series, 13.4 (1991), 338-46. This is an example of the type of study that’s been made of late medieval/early modern lawyers and their books, so that people have some frame of reference for her work.

Dr Connolly’s research concerns later medieval English literature and its manuscript context, and she has a strong interest in book history. Of her previous publications, the most relevant in this context to mention is an essay, ‘Sixteenth-Century Readers Reading Fifteenth-Century Religious Books: The Roberts Family of Middlesex’ that has recently appeared in a volume edited by Nicole Rice, Middle English Religious Writing in Practice: Texts, Readers, and Transformations (Turnhout: Brepols, 2013).


CMEMLL Annual Lecture

Professor Christopher W. Brooks (University of Durham)

Wednesday 9 October, 2013, 5.15 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English 

Christopher Brooks, Professor of Legal History at the University of Durham, will give a paper entitled ‘Paradise lost? Law, literature, and history in Restoration England’.

Prompted by the relative lack of ‘law and literature’ studies devoted to the second half of the seventeenth century, the lecture starts with a consideration of the relationship between ‘law and literature’ and legal history in the century between 1550 and 1640. It then looks at some of the significant transformations in legal life from 1640 through the Restoration period, and asks how literature (broadly defined) might help us better understand them.

Professor Brooks has wide-ranging research interests in the history of early-modern England, with a particular focus on the law and its social and cultural implications. His publications include Law, Politics and Society in Early Modern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009), and he is currently preparing the 1625-1689 volume of the Oxford History of the Laws of England.


Semester 2, 2012-13


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor Warren Brown (California Institute of Technology)

Thursday 18 April, 2013, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Warren Brown, Professor of History at Caltech and Donald Bullough Fellow at the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, will lead a reading group on Jennifer Jahner’s ‘Motives and Motifs in Early English Law: Reading the Mirror of Justices after Maitland’.

Professor Brown’s research interests are in the social history of mediaeval Europe, in conflict resolution and social and institutional memory. He is the author, most recently, of Violence in Medieval Europe (London: Longman Press, 2011), and, as editor, of Documentary Culture and the Laity in the Early Middle Ages (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013). At St Andrews he will be completing research on a new monograph, provisionally titled World in a Book: Lay Society in Early Medieval Europe.


CMEMLL Conference

Bonds, Lies, and Circumstances: Discourses of Truth-telling in the Renaissance.

An International and Interdisciplinary Conference

21st – 23rd March, 2013, School of English, University of St Andrews

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Professor John Kerrigan (University of Cambridge)
Professor Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex)
Professor Lorna Hutson (University of St Andrews)

Can we say that truth has ‘no more faces than one’? Montaigne implies that human relationships with truth are straightforward, whereas our attitudes towards falsehood are complicated by its multiplicity. But how stable is the notion of ‘truth’? Does truth – like falsehood – appear in many forms, and if so, can we ever take it at face value?

Legal, emotional, and spiritual concerns — all vital to truth-telling discourses — are intimately bound in the Renaissance. This conference offers a forum for the exploration of their intersections. The study of legal culture has become increasingly central to the analysis of early modern literary texts, and legal paradigms are inescapable when scholars turn their attention, as many have recently done, to the equivocal power of language to bind people together. We find the legal value of such bonds – in the form of oaths, promises and contracts – going hand in hand with interpersonal relationships and their emotional and spiritual dimensions.

Our objective is to foster debate about the marriage between two clearly connected fields: Law and Literature; and the study of early modern emotion. How do these fields work together? We form bonds; we tell lies; we search for and construct truths: but under what circumstances?

This conference will explore:

  • The connections between law, emotion, and obligation, and how the works of Shakespeare and his contemporaries engage with these dynamics.
  • The formation and evaluation of bonds in the early modern world.
  • How public/private spaces affect attitudes towards truth-telling.
  • The relationship between faith, truth, and honesty in the Renaissance.
  • How belief and trust are generated.
  • The binding power of language and rhetoric.
  • Transmissions of knowledge, belief, and emotion.

Sponsors:

Modern Humanities Research Association
Society for Renaissance Studies
Centre for Mediaeval and Early Modern Law and Literature
Medieval and Renaissance Research Group, School of English, University of St Andrews

General questions can be directed to the conference organizers – Rachel Holmes, reh32@st-andrews.ac.uk, and Toria Johnson, taj3@st-andrews.ac.uk.

Conference web pages


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor Mary Nyquist (University of Toronto)

Thursday 21 February, 2013, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English 

Mary Nyquist, Professor of English at the University of Toronto), will lead a reading group on her unpublished paper (delivered at Yale and Oxford) entitled “Milton’s Satan ‘at Large’: War slavery asius gentium, divine penalty, or inherently unjust?”

Mary Nyquist is a distinguished Milton scholar, and her publications include several influential essays on John Milton, George Buchanan, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. Her forthcoming book, Arbitrary Rule: Slavery, Tyranny and the Power of Life and Death (Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press, 2013) explores the complex links between the figurative ‘political slavery’ of early modern anti-tyranny discourse (in Buchanan, Milton, Hobbes, Locke), and the rise of transatlantic slavery.


CMEMLL Research Lecture

Professor Mary Nyquist (University of Toronto)

Wednesday 20 February, 2013, 2.15 pm
Lawson Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Mary Nyquist, Professor of English at the University of Toronto, will deliver a paper entitled ‘Hobbes, Injury and the Question of Resistance’.

Mary Nyquist is a distinguished Milton scholar, and her publications include several influential essays on John Milton, George Buchanan, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. Her forthcoming book, Arbitrary Rule: Slavery, Tyranny and the Power of Life and Death (Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press, 2013) explores the complex links between the figurative ‘political slavery’ of early modern anti-tyranny discourse (in Buchanan, Milton, Hobbes, Locke), and the rise of transatlantic slavery. She demonstrates how principles relating to political slavery are bound up with a Roman jurisprudential doctrine that sanctions the power of life and death held by the slaveholder over slaves and by the state over citizens.


Semester 1, 2012-13


CMEMLL Reading Group

Dr Justine Firnhaber-Baker (University of St Andrews)

Thursday 15 November, 2012, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Dr Justine Firnhaber-Baker of the School of History will lead a reading group based on Kathryn Gravdal’s ‘The Game of Rape: Sexual Violence and Social Class in the Pastourelle,’ which is chapter 4 in Ravishing Maidens: Writing Rape in Medieval French Literature and Law (Philadephia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1991), pp. 104‐121.

Dr Firnhaber-Baker’s research concerns power, law, government, and violence in the later Middle Ages, particularly in France. Her current project focuses on ‘private war’ in Southern France and what it tells us about violence and law in dispute resolution, royal/seigneurial relations, and the rise of the state. Her publications include Difference and Identity in Francia and Medieval France, ed., with Meredith Cohen (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2010).


CMEMLL Inaugural Event

Inauguration of the Centre for Mediaeval and Early Modern Law and Literature

Wednesday 3 October, 2012, 2.15-6 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Inaugural Lecture: Professor David Ibbetson (University of Cambridge) – ‘Early Modern Lawyers and Literary Texts’

2.15-3.15 pm

David Ibbetson, Regius Professor of Civil Law and President of Clare Hall at the University of Cambridge, will deliver the inaugural CMEMLL annual lecture entitled ‘Early Modern Lawyers and Literary Texts’.

Professor Ibbetson’s notable publications include but are not limited to: The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009); ‘Sixteenth Century Contract Law: Slade’s Case in Context,’ in OJLS 3:4 (1984), pp. 295-317; and ‘Assumpsit and Debt in the Early Sixteenth Century,’ in CLJ 41:1 (1982), pp. 142-161.

The lecture will be followed by a break for refreshments in the Stephen Boyd Room before the Panel Response.

Panel Response: Law and Literature, Mediaeval and Early Modern

Professor William I. Miller (University of Michigan)
Professor John Hudson (University of St Andrews)
Professor Lorna Hutson (University of St Andrews)

Chair: Professor Colin Kidd (University of St Andrews)

2.15-3.15 pm

William Miller, Thomas G. Long Professor of Law at the University of Michigan and Honorary Professor of History at the University of St Andrews, will join the Directors of CMEMLL: John Hudson, Professor of Legal History, and Lorna Hutson, Berry Professor of English Literature, in a panel response to Professor Ibbetson’s paper.  Colin Kidd, Professor of History, will chair the discussion.  They will also discuss the formation and purpose of CMEMLL.

There will be a wine reception to close the event.


Semester 2, 2011-12


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor Bradin Cormack (University of Chicago)

Monday 28 May, 2012, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Bradin Cormack, Professor of English at the University of Chicago and Corresponding Professor of CMEMLL, will lead our fourth CMEMLL reading group, the topic of which is ‘Affective Possession’, and the text is:

Bradin Cormack, ‘Shakespeare Possessed: Legal Affect and the Time of Holding,’ in Shakespeare and the Law ed. Paul Raffield and Gary Watt (Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2008), pp. 83-100.

Professor Cormack is the author of A Power to do Justice: Jurisdiction, English Literature and the Rise of Common Law, 1509-1625 (Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press, 2008), a book which has revealed how intimately English Renaissance authors knew the law, and how well they understood the creative potential of its jurisdictional instability.

He is co-editor, with Leonard Barkan and Sean Keilen, of The Forms of Renaissance Thought: New Essays on Literature and Culture (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008).


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor William I. Miller (University of Michigan)

Thursday 17 May, 2012, 1-2 pm
Old Class Library, St John’s House, 65 South Street, School of History

William I. Miller, Thomas G. Long Professor of Law at the University of Michigan and Honorary Professor of History at St Andrews, will lead our third CMEMLL reading group.

The text for reading is ‘Thorstein the Staffstruck’ from Hrafnkel’s Saga and other Icelandic Storiestr. Hermann Pálsson (London: Penguin, 1971), pp. 72-81 – a mere 9 pages but ‘rich beyond belief in matters social and legal and moral’ (Prof Miller).

Professor Miller has written influentially and provocatively on blood feud and on the involvement of the emotions in law, relationship and self-assessment. His most recent publications are Losing It (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2011), Auden and the Polar Bear: Luck, Law and Largesse in a Medieval Tale of Risky Business (Leiden: Brill, 2008) and An Eye for an Eye (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006).


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor John Hudson (University of St Andrews)

Wednesday 22 February, 2012, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

John Hudson, Professor of Legal History and Head of the School of History, will lead our second CMEMLL reading group meeting. The text for reading is Pierre Bourdieu, ‘The Force of Law: Towards a Sociology of the Juridical Field’, translated by Richard Terdiman, Hastings Law Journal, 38 (5), 1986, pp. 814- 853.

Professor Hudson’s research interests began with law and land-holding in twelfth-century England, and this subject has remained central to much of his subsequent work, leading up to his forthcoming book, Volume II of the Oxford History of the Laws of England (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012). It covers the period 821-1216 and is described as ‘the most comprehensive history of medieval English law published for over one hundred years’.

Some of his legal history work plays with the applicability to mediaeval situations of ideas from modern legal theory; this work is furthered by his visiting association with the University of Michigan Law School, where he enjoys the title of William W. Cook Global Law Professor. He has two other main areas of research interest –  one is mediaeval historical writing, mostly in England, and the other is nineteenth-century writing on the Middle Ages, and in particular the work of the greatest of legal historians, F. W. Maitland.


Semester 1, 2011-12


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor Peter Brooks (Princeton University)

Thursday 20 October, 2011, 10.30-12 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Peter Brooks, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Scholar in the University Center for Human Values and the Department of Comparative Literature at Princeton University, will lead our inaugural CMEMLL reading group.

The text for the reading group is: Peter Brooks, ‘Law and its Other in Literary Theory,’ in Frame, 24.1 (May, 2011), pp. 32-52.

Peter Brooks has published on narrative and narrative theory, on the 19th and 20th century novel, mainly French and English, and, more recently, on the interrelations of law and literature. He is the author of several books, including Reading for the Plot (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1984), Troubling Confessions: Speaking Guilt in Law and Literature (Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press, 2000) and Law’s Stories: Narrative and Rhetoric in the Law with Paul Gewirtz (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1996).

 

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