2013/14

Semester 2, 2013-14


CMEMLL Research Lecture

Professor Bradin Cormack (Princeton University)

Thursday 15 May, 2014, 3.15 pm
Garden Seminar Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Bradin Cormack, Professor of English at Princeton University and Corresponding Professor of CMEMLL, will give a paper entitled ‘In the time of example: case thinking in Shakespearean Drama.’

As Professor Cormack explains:

‘This paper places Shakespeare’s comedies, in particular The Comedy of Errors and The Merchant of Venice, in the double context of case-jurisprudence in the sixteenth-century common law and of exemplarity in sixteenth-century historiographical writing. It suggests that Shakespeare’s comedies are marked microtextually and structurally by the consideration not only of the rhetorical impact of examples but, more basically, of what, logically, the example is such that it might constitute knowledge. I will be considering in particular the question of how examples or cases relate to time, and, in addition to Shakespeare, I will consider some passages in Sidney’s Defense, which is of course notorious for the case it makes for the case.

My talk, which will focus on Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors with some attention to Sidney, will be self-explanatory. If you would like to read something in advance, I suggest Agamben’s essay “What is a Paradigm,” which informs some of the ways in which I am thinking about example.’

Download text here

Professor Cormack is author of A Power to Do Justice: Jurisdiction, English Literature, and the Rise of Common Law, 1509-1625 (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2007) and of Book Use, Book Theory, co-authored with Carla Mazzio (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Library, 2005).

He is co-editor, with Leonard Barkan and Sean Keilen, of The Forms of Renaissance Thought: New Essays on Literature and Culture (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008) and, with Richard Strier and Martha Nussbaum, of Shakespeare and the Law: A Conversation among the Disciplines and Professions (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2013).

He has published on issues of sovereignty in Shakespeare Quarterly, and he is currently working on two books, a philosophical study of Shakespeare’s sonnets and a short monograph on Shakespeare and Law.


CMEMLL Research Lecture

Professor Mark Godfrey (University of Glasgow)

Thursday 8 May, 2014, 5.15 pm
Garden Seminar Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Mark Godfrey, Professor of Law at the University of Glasgow, will give a paper entitled ‘Courts and Councils: Litigation and Jurisdiction in Late Medieval Scotland.’

Note from the speaker: “If I were to recommend one piece of background reading which would introduce the topic well it would probably be: A. M. Godfrey, ‘Parliament and the Law’, in Keith M. Brown and Alan R. Macdonald (eds.), The History of the Scottish Parliament. Volume 3: Parliament in Context 1235-1707 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2010), pp 157-185.”

Professor Mark Godfrey is author of Civil Justice in Renaissance Scotland: the Origins of a Central Court (Series: Medieval law and its practice, 4) (Leiden; Boston, MA: Brill, 2009). He is a member of the AHRC Peer Review College, and has also served on the Council of the Stair Society, the Scottish Record Society, the Editorial Board of The Records of the Parliament of Scotland to 1707, as Secretary of the Scottish Legal History Group, and in 2011-12 as National Adjudicator for the English Speaking Union / Essex Court Chambers National Mooting Competition.

Mark’s research interests are in legal history and the law of obligations. His main research field is the history of central justice, courts, jurisdiction, private law and dispute settlement in medieval and early modern Scotland. He has published extensively on the origins and development of the Court of Session, and on the foundation of the College of Justice in sixteenth-century Scotland.


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor David M. Rabban (University of Texas at Austin)

Tuesday 29 April, 2014, 1-2 pm
New Seminar Room, St John’s House, 65 South Street, School of History

David M. Rabban, the Dahr Jamail, Randall Hage Jamail and Robert Lee Jamail Regents Chair and Professor of Law at the University of Texas at Austin, author of Law’s History: American Legal Thought and the Transatlantic Turn to History (on American legal historians and medievalism), will lead a reading group on Maitland.  The reading for this session is Chapter XII of David Rabban’s book, Law’s History:

Rabban, David M., ‘Maitland: The Maturity of English Legal History,’ in Law’s History: American Legal Thought and the Transatlantic Turn to History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), pp. 383-422.

Rabban plans to touch briefly on the relationship between Maitland and the American legal historians in his talk on Monday, but wishes to discuss Maitland more broadly and in more detail in the reading group.

Professor Rabban’s research focuses on labor law, higher education and the law, and American legal history. He is best known for his path-breaking work on free speech in American history. He is the author of Free Speech in Its Forgotten Years, 1870-1920 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,1997), which received the Forkosch Prize from the Journal of the History of Ideas for “the best book in intellectual history published in 1997″. His many articles have appeared in Yale Law JournalStanford Law ReviewUniversity of Chicago Law Review, and elsewhere.


CMEMLL Research Seminar

Professor David M. Rabban (University of Texas at Austin)

Monday 28 April, 2014, 5.15 pm
Old Class Library, St John’s House, 65 South Street, School of History

David M. Rabban, the Dahr Jamail, Randall Hage Jamail and Robert Lee Jamail Regents Chair and Professor of Law at the University of Texas at Austin, author of Law’s History: American Legal Thought and the Transatlantic Turn to History (on American legal historians and medievalism), will give a paper entitled ‘Making Law Scientific: The Founding Generation of American Legal Scholars on Mediaeval English Law.’

Professor Rabban’s research focuses on labor law, higher education and the law, and American legal history. He is best known for his path-breaking work on free speech in American history. He is the author of Free Speech in Its Forgotten Years, 1870-1920 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,1997), which received the Forkosch Prize from the Journal of the History of Ideas for “the best book in intellectual history published in 1997″. His many articles have appeared in Yale Law JournalStanford Law ReviewUniversity of Chicago Law Review, and elsewhere.


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor Emanuele Conte (Università degli Studi Roma Tre)

Tuesday 15 April, 2014, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Emanuele Conte, Professor of Law in the Department of Jurisprudence at the Università degli Studi Roma Tre, will lead a reading group on ‘the process of isolation of the legal Science, in connection with the German historical school.’
Professor Conte laments his lack of materials on his topic in English, but suggests reading the introduction (preface) to Savigny’s The History of the Law during the Middle Ages trans. Cathcart (1829) as a starting point, accessible at Google Books.
For those of us capable of reading Italian, he suggests his paper ‘Storia interna e storia esterna: Il diritto medievale da Francesco Calasso alla fine del XX secolo’ as supplementary reading, accessible on Academia.edu.
Professor Conte’s research interests span Medieval Canon & Roman Law, European Legal History, Criminal Procedure, Law and Humanities, and Constitutional Law.  He is author of Tres Libri codicis: La ricomparsa del testo e l’esegesi scolastica prima di Accursio (Ius commune)(Frankfurt: V. Klostermann, 1990).

CMEMLL/SAIMS Research Seminar

Professor Emanuele Conte (Università degli Studi Roma Tre)

Monday 14 April, 2014, 5.15 pm
Old Class Library, St John’s House, 65 South Street, School of History

Emanuele Conte, Professor of Law in the Department of Jurisprudence at Università degli Studi Roma Tre, will lead a seminar entitled ‘Karissimo amico domino Aymerico. The turn to Roman procedure and the beginning of legal doctrines in the 12th Century.’

Professor Conte’s research interests span Medieval Canon & Roman Law, European Legal History, Criminal Procedure, Law and Humanities, and Constitutional Law.  He is author of Tres Libri codicis: La ricomparsa del testo e l’esegesi scolastica prima di Accursio (Ius commune) (Frankfurt: V. Klostermann, 1990).


SAIMS Research Seminar

Professor Phillipp Schofield (Aberystwyth University)

Monday 7 April, 2014, 5.15 pm
Old Class Library, St John’s House, 65 South Street, School of History

Phillipp Schofield, Professor of Mediaeval History at Aberystwyth University, will give a paper entitled ‘Litigation and the nature of proof in English manorial courts in the later thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries.’

Professor Schofield is presently undertaking a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship on the Great Famine in early fourteenth-century England.  He is also engaged in writing up AHRC-funded research on litigation on manorial courts and seals in medieval Wales, and is completing a volume for Manchester University Press on Peasants and Historians: the historiography of the medieval English peasantry. He is also co-editor of the Economic History Review.

His publications include: With R.A. Griffiths, eds., Wales and the Welsh in the Middle Ages (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2011); with Thijs Lambrecht, Credit and the rural economy in North-western Europe, c. 1200-c.1800 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2009); and Peasant and community in medieval England (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2003).


CMEMLL Research Lecture

Professor Colin Kidd (University of St Andrews)

Wednesday 12 March, 2014, 5.15 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Colin Kidd, Professor of History at the University of St Andrews, will give a paper entitled ‘The Trials of Douglas Young: Hitler, Aristophanes and the SNP.’

2013 saw the centenary of the birth of Douglas Young, one of the most influential figures in twentieth-century Scottish nationalism. Leader of the SNP from 1942 to the end of the War, Young was imprisoned twice for refusing conscription – both military and industrial. He was also an eminent classicist, who translated some of the plays of Aristophanes into Lallans (Lowland Scots). Colin Kidd will investigate Young’s chequered career, and examine the broader context of the curious Scottish nationalist response to the world crisis of the 1940s.’

Professor Kidd’s current research focuses on the intellectual history of the English Enlightenment and its nineteenth-century aftermath, particularly in fields such as antiquarianism, mythography and religious apologetic.

His publications include: Union and Unionisms: Political Thought in Scotland 1500-2000 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008); The Forging of Races: Race and Scripture in the Atlantic World 1600-2000 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006); and British Identities before Nationalism: Ethnicity and Nationhood in the British Atlantic World, 1600-1800 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999).


CMEMLL Reading Group

Professor John Hudson and Cory Hitt (University of St Andrews)

Tuesday 11 February, 2014, 1-2 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

John Hudson, Professor of Legal History, and Cory Hitt, Marie Curie Ph.D. Fellow in the School of History will lead a reading group on Marie de France’s ‘Lanval’.  The text of Marie de France’s ‘Lanval’ can be downloaded in French and in an English translation.

Quoting John Hudson, ‘Marie de France’s Lanval is a beautifully crafted Lai (i.e. Short story) from the circle of Henry II.  Steeped in the supernatural and the erotic, it also provides fascinating material for the procedure and politics of court cases in the late twelfth century.’

Professor Hudson’s research interests began with law and land-holding in twelfth-century England, and this subject has remained central to much of his subsequent work, leading up to his recent volume of The Oxford History of the Laws of England, 871-1216 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).  Some of his legal history work plays with the applicability to mediaeval situations of ideas from modern legal theory; this work is furthered by his visiting association with the University of Michigan Law School, where he enjoys the title of William W. Cook Global Law Professor. He has two other main areas of research interest –  one is mediaeval historical writing, mostly in England, and the other is nineteenth-century writing on the Middle Ages, and in particular the work of the greatest of legal historians, F. W. Maitland.

Cory Hitt is a Ph.D. candidate in Medieval History, supervised by John Hudson. She specialises in 12th-century literature and law in France and Iceland. She is also an Early Stage Researcher with PIMIC (Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom).


Semester 1, 2013-14


CMEMLL Reading Group

Dr Jamie Page (University of St Andrews)

Thursday 5 December, 2013, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Jamie Page, recent graduate and early career researcher of the School of History, will lead a reading group entitled “Sexual Subjectivities and Medieval Court Records”.

This session will examine three legal case studies from late medieval Germany and England featuring individuals whose experience at the hands of the authorities poses questions about sexual identity, and prompts challenges about the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of past subjectivities.

Some of this unpublished material comes from Dr Page’s recently completed PhD thesis on prostitution in the later Middle Ages in which he examines the evidence for prostitution as a sexual identity in German-speaking regions.

The texts for discussion are:

  1. David Lorenzo Boyd and Ruth Mazo Karras, “Ut cum muliere”: A Male Transvestite Prostitute in Fourteenth Century London”. In Premodern Sexualities, ed. Louise Fradenburg and Carl Freccero. (London: Routledge, 1996), pp. 99-116.
  2. Helmut Puff, “Female Sodomy: The Trial of Katherina Hetzeldorfer (1477),” in Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 30:1 (2000), pp. 41-61.
  3. “Clandestine prostitution and abortion in 14th-century Zurich: A Transcription from the Archives”.  In German, but a translation will follow in the week before the reading group.

Download texts here:

“Ut cum muliere” A Male Transvestite Prostitute in Fourteenth-Century London
Female Sodomy: The Trial of Katherina Hetzeldorfer (1477) by Helmut Puff
Staatsarchiv Zürich B VI 195 ff. 16v-18v

Dr Page is interested in gender, the history of sexuality, and the social history of towns in later medieval Germany and Switzerland. His primary research interests concern prostitution and brothels in medieval German-speaking regions. He is currently working on a monograph proposal based upon his Ph.D. thesis on the same topic, and on an article which reevaluates the role of brothel ordinances (Frauenhausordnungen) in the regulation of prostitution in medieval Germany.


CMEMLL Reading Group

Dr Margaret Connolly (University of St Andrews)

Thursday 14 November, 2013, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Dr Margaret Connolly, Senior Lecturer in the School of English, will lead a reading group entitled ‘A 16th Century Lawyer and his 15th Century Books’.  This topic draws from her current research on a 16th Century gentry family which is provisionally entitled: Newly Reformed Readers and their Reading: A Sixteenth-Century Family and their Medieval Books, taking one member of the family, Thomas Roberts, who was a London lawyer as the focus of the session.

The texts for discussion are:

  1. A summary of how the material relating to Thomas Roberts is like/is not like that relating to other contemporary lawyers, and which lists the contents of surviving books that may be associated with him.
  2. An article by C. E. Moreton, ‘The “Library of a Late Fifteenth-Century Lawyer’, The Library6th Series, 13.4 (1991), 338-46. This is an example of the type of study that’s been made of late medieval/early modern lawyers and their books, so that people have some frame of reference for her work.

Download texts:
Summary of Margaret Connolly’s research
The ‘Library’ of a Late-Fifteenth-Century Lawyer By C. E. Moreton

Dr Connolly’s research concerns later medieval English literature and its manuscript context, and she has a strong interest in book history. Of her previous publications, the most relevant in this context to mention is an essay, ‘Sixteenth-Century Readers Reading Fifteenth-Century Religious Books: The Roberts Family of Middlesex’ that has recently appeared in a volume edited by Nicole Rice, Middle English Religious Writing in Practice: Texts, Readers, and Transformations (Turnhout: Brepols, 2013).


CMEMLL Annual Lecture

Professor Christopher W. Brooks (University of Durham)

Wednesday 9 October, 2013, 5.15 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English 

Christopher Brooks, Professor of Legal History at the University of Durham, will give a paper entitled ‘Paradise lost? Law, literature, and history in Restoration England’.

Prompted by the relative lack of ‘law and literature’ studies devoted to the second half of the seventeenth century, the lecture starts with a consideration of the relationship between ‘law and literature’ and legal history in the century between 1550 and 1640. It then looks at some of the significant transformations in legal life from 1640 through the Restoration period, and asks how literature (broadly defined) might help us better understand them.

Download poster

Professor Brooks has wide-ranging research interests in the history of early-modern England, with a particular focus on the law and its social and cultural implications. His publications include Law, Politics and Society in Early Modern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009), and he is currently preparing the 1625-1689 volume of the Oxford History of the Laws of England.

 

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