Tag Archives: Early Modern

CMEMLL Event: Francis Beaumont, The Masque of the Olympic Knights (1613)

screen-shot-2016-12-05-at-18-23-19Rachel Horrocks and CMEMLL member Jane Pettegree are looking to gather people from the School of English postgraduate community and hopefully further afield for a workshop and partial reconstruction of a Jacobean period masque, with dancing and music, next semester.

The masque is Francis Beaumont’s The Masque of the Olympic Knights (1613) (also known as The Masque of the Inner Temple and Gray’s Inn), what might be termed an Inns of Court production.

Early opera developed alongside courtly entertainments called ‘masques’, which combined music, dancing, dramatic verse and spectacle. The Masque of the Olympic Knights was written to celebrate the marriage of the eldest daughter of King James VI/I in 1613/14, and would have involved both professional performers and leading members of the Jacobean court.

The aim of this event is to explore how it felt to take part in a masque, and for the public showcase, to be present at such a performance. Join us and become a Duke, Duchess or even a King for a day.  The dancing workshop will be led by Anne Daye, a leading UK expert in early dance, who lectures in historical dance at Laban, Trinity College of Music and RADA.  Anne is chair of HDS (the Historical Dance Society).  The event is supported by the HDS, the Music Centre and the School of English at the University of St Andrews.

A provisional timetable for the weekend is:

Dance Workshops

Friday 10 February, 19:00–21:00

Public Talk by Anne Daye

Saturday 11th February, 09:30–10:30

Dance Workshops

Saturday 11th February, 10:30–17:00

Public showcase

Saturday 11 February, 19:00 to 21:00

Venue

Younger Hall, North St, St Andrews

The public talk and showcase are both free and open-door events.

Workshop participation is free but spaces should be confirmed in advance.

To take part in the dance workshop : contact Rachel Horrocks, email rph2@st-andrews.ac.uk

To join our Jacobean dance band : contact Jane Pettegree, email jkp1@st-andrews.ac.uk

 

 

CMEMLL Research Seminar: Hannah Worthen (Leicester/The National Archives)

Wednesday 30 November, 12.00 – 13.30 pm
GR03, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge

‘‘For the hazards of War are equall’: The Narratives of Royalist Widows in Print, Petitions and at Law during the Civil Wars’

Abstract

The infamous 1649 publication, Eikon Basilike, professed to be authored by Charles I, asked ‘what Widdowes or Orphans tears can witnesse against me, the just cry of which must now be avenged with My own bloud? For the hazards of War are equall, nor doth the Cannon know any respect of Persons’. The Civil Wars of 1642-1649 were brutal, and there had been a clamour to avenge the blood of the fallen with the execution of the King who was deemed by many to be responsible. Depictions of widows became part of the political discourse surrounding the wars: the desolate and suffering widows who epitomised the losses of England as well as the deviant widows who stepped beyond customary boundaries during those turbulent times.

During the Civil Wars and Interregnum Parliament seized the lands of Royalists in order to fund their war effort. Consequently, many widows who had been deemed to be ‘delinquent’ turned to petitions and the legal process in order to protect their family’s landed interests. These women had lost husbands and sons to the war but were not viewed as blameless victims by the Parliamentarian authorities. This paper will examine the petitions and legal challenges submitted by these Royalist widows and look to the ways in which they described their suffering and, therefore, drew upon wider narratives of the losses of widows during this period.

The discussion will examine the intersection between legal texts, petitions and print discourse in order to analyse the experience of Royalist widows who sought to defend their lands. By drawing upon narratives of loss, poverty and the universal suffering of war time, many of these widows were able to successfully navigate political and legal processes and regain the property and status that the wars had cost them.

Organised jointly with the Early Modern Interdisciplinary Seminar.


Hannah Worthen is a final-year PhD student researching at The University of Leicester in collaboration with The National Archives.

CMEMLL/ILCR Annual Lecture: Steve White (Emory) & Gadi Algazi (Tel Aviv)

‘Boy meets Gift: or, The Uses of Literature’

Monday 18 April, 5.15 – 7.00 pm
Parliament Hall, South Street

This lecture, given collaboratively by Professor Stephen D. White (Emory) and Professor Gadi Algazi (Tel Aviv) is a joint venture of CMEMLL and the Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research. This year, the CMEMLL Annual Lecture is also the ILCR Annual Academic Lecture.

A wine reception will follow the event.

All welcome.


Stephen D. White is Asa G. Candler Professor Emeritus of Medieval History at Emory University.

He is author of Custom, Kinship, and Gifts to Saints: the Laudatio Parentum in Western France, 1050-1150Sir Edward Coke and the Grievances of the Commonwealth, 1621-1628Feuding and Peacemaking in Eleventh-Century France; and Re-Thinking Kinship and Feudalism in Early Medieval Europe.

He is currently completing a collection of essays on treason, vengeance and feuding in eleventh- and twelfth-century France and England; and a book manuscript provisionally entitled, ‘Bad Kings, Felonious Barons, and Unfaithful Ladies: The Representation of Treason Trials in Old French Literature, c.1150 to c.1240.’


Gadi Algazi is Professor of History at the Department of History, Tel Aviv University, and senior editor of the journal History & Memory. He is also member of the editorial board of the journals Past & Present and Historische Anthropologie.

He is author of Herrengewalt und Gewalt der Herren im späten Mittelalter: Herrschaft, Gegenseitigkeit und Sprachgebrauch [Historische Studien, vol. 17] (Frankfurt am Main/New York: Campus, 1996) [Seigniorial Power and Violence in the Later Middle Ages: Lordship, Reciprocity and Language Use] and, with Valentin Groebner and Bernhard Jussen, he coedited Negotiating the Gift: Pre-Modern Figurations of Exchange (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2003).

He is currently completing a book on the shaping of scholars’ way of life and habitus between 1480 and 1630.

CMEMLL Postgraduate and Early Career Masterclass: Todd Butler (Washington State)

Tuesday 28 March, 4.00 pm
Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

All welcome.

Todd Butler will lead a masterclass for postgraduate students and early career researchers on the following material.

Reading

Anon – A True Report of the Araignment, Tryall, Conviction, and Demnation of a Popish Priest (1607).

Todd Butler, ‘Equivocation, Cognition, and Political Authority in Early Modern England’ (2012).

 

After the session, we will be joining Todd for dinner at Zizzi’s. All parties who wish to attend should RSVP to Toria Johnson (taj3@st-andrews.ac.uk) and attend at their own expense.


Todd Butler is Associate Professor and Chair at the Faculty of English, Washington State University.

His main area of publication and research involves early modern literature, religion, and political theory, but he maintains an active interest in early modern crime and law, and how classical rhetoric in particular can help us understand—if not challenge—processes of judicial decision-making. His publications include Imagination and Politics in Seventeenth Century England (Ashgate, 2008) and ‘Swearing Justice in Henry Goodcole and the Witch of Edmonton‘ (Studies in English Literature 50:1, 2010).