Tag Archives: John Hudson

Reading Group: Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution (I)

Tuesday 6 October, 12:30-2 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History

The first CMEMLL Reading Group and the first meeting of the Institute of Legal And Constitutional Research will take place next Tuesday lunchtime (6th October). We’ll meet in the Old Seminar Room on the first floor of 71 South Street at 12.30pm for a sandwich lunch, with the Reading Group on ‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution (I)’ starting soon after 1pm and finishing in time for people to teach at 2pm.

The Reading Group will involve an introduction by John Hudson and Lorna Hutson followed by discussion on the theme of ‘Literature, Law and Constitution’.

The background reading is Chapter 1 of Christopher Warren, Literature and the Law of Nations, 1580-1680 (Oxford: OUP, 2015), available at:

http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719342.001.0001/acprof-9780198719342-chapter-1

We look forward to seeing you there.

 

Conference: Emotions in the Courtroom

3 – 4 May, 2015
St John’s House, 71 South Street, St Andrews 

The recent surge of interest in the history of emotions has seen medievalists uncover a broad range of new source material recording the affective lives of Europeans in the Middle Ages. A parallel growth of interest in crime and judicial records from ecclesiastical and secular courts has identified these as excellent sources and made clear that the courtroom could be a locus for emotionally charged events. This one and a half day interdisciplinary symposium brings together scholars of law, literature and history to examine the role that emotions played in legal conduct and procedure.

The symposium is free of charge but pre-booking is required before 25th April, 2015. For pre-booking and information, contact:

kimberley.knight@sydney.edu.au


The symposium has been generously supported by:


Conveners:

Kimberley-Joy Knight (CHE, The University of Sydney)

Jamie Page (University of Durham)

John Hudson (University of St Andrews)


Schedule

Sunday 3 May

15:00 – 15:30        Registration

15:30 – 15:45        Welcome (Kimberley-Joy Knight, CHE, University of Sydney)

15:45 – 16:45        Hans Jacob Orning (University of Oslo)

“Once again I’m in trouble, as have received the wrath of my master”. Law, anger and mercy in Norwegian courts in the High Middle Ages

Ian Forrest (Oriel College, University of Oxford)

Faith and feeling in late-medieval litigation”

16:45 – 17:00        Coffee break

17:00 – 17:45        William I. Miller (University of Michigan)

Fear and Anger in and around courts, saga style”

17:45 – 18:30        Reception

Monday 4 May

09:30 – 09:45        Late Registration

09:45 – 10:45        Merridee L Bailey (CHE, University of Adelaide)

The use of the law in shaping emotions and merchant experiences in England’s courts of equity”

John Hudson (University of St Andrews)

Frustration leads to anger: laymen and clerics in the courtroom”

10:45 – 11:00        Coffee Break

11:00 – 12:00        Keynote: Stephen D. White (Emory/Harvard University)

Trying to Keep Emotions Out of the Courtroom: Courtliness and Good Counsel in Girart de Roussillon”

12:00 – 13:00        Lunch

13:00 – 14:00        Susanne Pohl-Zucker (Independent Researcher)

Provocation and the Heat of Anger: Diminished responsibility and the judgment of manslaughter in Early Modern Germany”

                              Seb Coxon (University College, London)

Laughter in court: literary models of jest and justice in sixteenth-century German Schwanksammlungen

14:00 – 14:15        Coffee Break

14:15 – 15:15        Elizabeth Papp Kamali (University of Michigan)

The Devil’s Daughter of Hell Fire: The Role of Anger in Medieval English Felony Adjudication”

15:15 – 16:00        Closing Discussion

 

Reading Group: Alibis of Empire

Tuesday 17 February, 1 – 2 pm
Garden Seminar Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English 

John Hudson, Professor of Legal History at the University of St Andrews, will lead a reading group on Karuna Mantena’s Alibis of Empire: Henry Maine and the Ends of Liberal Imperialism (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010).

The texts for this reading group are:


Professor Hudson’s research interests began with law and land-holding in twelfth-century England, and this subject has remained central to much of his subsequent work, leading up to his recent volume of The Oxford History of the Laws of England, 871-1216 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).  Some of his legal history work plays with the applicability to mediaeval situations of ideas from modern legal theory; this work is furthered by his visiting association with the University of Michigan Law School, where he enjoys the title of William W. Cook Global Law Professor. He has two other main areas of research interest –  one is mediaeval historical writing, mostly in England, and the other is nineteenth-century writing on the Middle Ages, and in particular the work of the greatest of legal historians, F. W. Maitland.

 

Reading Group: Drafting Magna Carta

Tuesday 21 October, 2014, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English 

John Hudson, Professor of Legal History at the University of St Andrews, will lead a reading group entitled ‘Drafting Magna Carta’.

This reading group will involve a close comparison of the famous Magna Carta of 1215 and a preceding set of demands known as The Articles of the Barons. Drawing on these texts, we will consider issues of the minutiae of drafting, of these and other documents; the composers of the Charter; and political thought.

The texts for the reading group Latin texts of Magna Carta and the Articles of the Barons, colour coded to show the differences between them; and translations of the two documents, unfortunately not colour coded.  Attendees should look at the texts in advance.

The colour code is:
Red – clause unique to one of the two documents
Blue – rephrasing of part of or whole clause
Green – Minor (e.g. grammatical) change to one wond
Black – common to both documents
Purple – a single word in one document replaced by another word in the other
Texts can be accessed here:

Professor Hudson’s research interests began with law and land-holding in twelfth-century England, and this subject has remained central to much of his subsequent work, leading up to his recent volume of The Oxford History of the Laws of England, 871-1216 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).  Some of his legal history work plays with the applicability to mediaeval situations of ideas from modern legal theory; this work is furthered by his visiting association with the University of Michigan Law School, where he enjoys the title of William W. Cook Global Law Professor. He has two other main areas of research interest –  one is mediaeval historical writing, mostly in England, and the other is nineteenth-century writing on the Middle Ages, and in particular the work of the greatest of legal historians, F. W. Maitland.