Tag Archives: Law & Literature

CMEMLL Event: Francis Beaumont, The Masque of the Olympic Knights (1613)

screen-shot-2016-12-05-at-18-23-19Rachel Horrocks and CMEMLL member Jane Pettegree are looking to gather people from the School of English postgraduate community and hopefully further afield for a workshop and partial reconstruction of a Jacobean period masque, with dancing and music, next semester.

The masque is Francis Beaumont’s The Masque of the Olympic Knights (1613) (also known as The Masque of the Inner Temple and Gray’s Inn), what might be termed an Inns of Court production.

Early opera developed alongside courtly entertainments called ‘masques’, which combined music, dancing, dramatic verse and spectacle. The Masque of the Olympic Knights was written to celebrate the marriage of the eldest daughter of King James VI/I in 1613/14, and would have involved both professional performers and leading members of the Jacobean court.

The aim of this event is to explore how it felt to take part in a masque, and for the public showcase, to be present at such a performance. Join us and become a Duke, Duchess or even a King for a day.  The dancing workshop will be led by Anne Daye, a leading UK expert in early dance, who lectures in historical dance at Laban, Trinity College of Music and RADA.  Anne is chair of HDS (the Historical Dance Society).  The event is supported by the HDS, the Music Centre and the School of English at the University of St Andrews.

A provisional timetable for the weekend is:

Dance Workshops

Friday 10 February, 19:00–21:00

Public Talk by Anne Daye

Saturday 11th February, 09:30–10:30

Dance Workshops

Saturday 11th February, 10:30–17:00

Public showcase

Saturday 11 February, 19:00 to 21:00

Venue

Younger Hall, North St, St Andrews

The public talk and showcase are both free and open-door events.

Workshop participation is free but spaces should be confirmed in advance.

To take part in the dance workshop : contact Rachel Horrocks, email rph2@st-andrews.ac.uk

To join our Jacobean dance band : contact Jane Pettegree, email jkp1@st-andrews.ac.uk

 

 

CMEMLL Reading Group: Futures of Law and Literature (II)

Monday 12 December, 4.00 – 5.00 pm
Syndicate Room, Wolfson College, University of Cambridge

The Reading Group will involve a brief introduction by Rachel Holmes and Andrew Zurcher followed by discussion on the theme of ‘Futures of Law and Literature’. Previous attendance at the CMEMLL Reading Group is not requisite to participation.

The background reading for our discussion comprises the following:

Grant Williams, ‘Law and the Production of Literature: An Introductory Perspective.’ In Donald Beecher et al, ed., Taking Exception to the Law: Materializing Injustice in Early Modern English Literature (University of Toronto Press, 2015), pp. 3–43.

 

CMEMLL Research Seminar: Jackie Watson (Oxford Spires Academy/Birkbeck)

Tuesday 15 November, 5.45 – 7.00 pm
Gatsby Room, Chancellor’s Centre, Wolfson College, University of Cambridge

‘[T]hough Ramme stinks with cookes and ale,/ Yet say thers many a worthy lawyers chamber,/ Buts vpon Rame-Alley’: An Innsman Goes to the Playhouse’

Abstract

Combining ideas of early modern sense perception with research on the Inns of Court, London topography and theatre history, this paper is an experimental journey to a performance of Lording Barry’s ‘Ram Alley’ at nearby Whitefriars. It considers the sensory interactions between audience and dramatic locations: playing space, imaginative locus and surrounding city.

This paper brings the two areas of research together, and builds on Jackie Watson’s recent article on the nearby Ram Alley for the Map of Early Modern London. It imagines a day in 1607, or perhaps 1608. An Innsman – call him Francis, for sake of argument – leaves his lodgings in Middle Temple to visit the nearby Whitefriars Theatre, where Lording Barry’s Ram Alley is being performed by the Children of the King’s Revels. Using ideas from performance and theatre history, London topography and audience studies, as well as work on the Inns as sites of social mobility, legal and wider learning, and homosocial networks, my paper will reconstruct likely elements of Francis’ journey and his experience of this particular play.

In the quotation from the Induction to Every Man Out of his Humour which forms the title of this paper, Ben Jonson’s language plays with the conjunction of hearing, tasting and understanding. Barry may not have had such lofty ambitions for his comedy, but in its intertextuality, its precise location and its evocation of the early modern legal world, it aims directly to play with the familiarities and to engage the senses of ‘Francis’ and his fellows.

Organised jointly with the Wolfson College Humanities Society.


Jackie Watson completed her PhD at Birkbeck College, London, in 2015, with a thesis looking at the life of the Jacobean courtier, Sir Thomas Overbury, and examining the representations of courtiership on stage between 1599 and 1613. She is co-editor of The Senses in Early Modern England, 1558–1660 (Manchester University Press, 2015), to which she contributed a chapter on the deceptive nature of sight.

Recent published articles have looked at the early modern Inns of Court, at Innsmen as segments of playhouse audiences and at London topography.  She is currently working on a monograph with a focus on Overbury’s letters, courtiership and the Jacobean playhouse.

CMEMLL Reading Group: Futures of Law and Literature (i)

Monday 24 October, 4.00 – 5.00 pm
Erasmus Room, Queens’ College, University of Cambridge

This year the St Andrews Centre for Mediaeval and Early Modern Law and Literature (CMEMLL) becomes a collaborative forum between St Andrews, Oxford, and Cambridge, with Law and Literature events continuing at St Andrews under the auspices of the Institute for Legal and Constitutional Research.

This year’s theme is ‘Futures of Law and Literature’. The full schedule of these sessions and other CMEMLL events can be found here:

http://cmemll.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/events/201617-2/.

The Reading Group will involve a brief introduction by Rachel Holmes and Andrew Zurcher followed by discussion on the theme of ‘Futures of Law and Literature’.

The background reading for our discussion comprises the following two articles:

Bernadette Meyler, ‘Law, Literature, and History: The Love Triangle.’ UC Irvine Law Review 365 (2015).

Greta Olson, ‘Futures of Law and Literature: A Preliminary Overview from a Culturalist Perspective.’ Law and Literature In-Between: Contemporary Inter- and Transdisciplinary Approaches, ed. Christian Hiebaum, Susanne Knaller, Doris Pichler (Bielefeld: transcript, 2015. 37-69).

CMEMLL/ILCR Round Table: Law and Drama in Early Modern England

Capture1-4 pm, 5 May, 2016 
Kennedy Hall, School of English, The Scores 

Round Table Speakers

Quentin Skinner, Barber Beaumont Professor of the Humanities, Queen Mary, University of London, author of Forensic Shakespeare (2014)
Andrew Zurcher, Queens College, Cambridge, author of Shakespeare and Law (2010)
Lorna Hutson, St Andrews, author of The Invention of Suspicion (2007) and Circumstantial Shakespeare (2015)

Schedule

1 pm – catered lunch in the Stephen Boyd Room
2-4 pm – Round Table Discussion in the Lawson Room 

Preparatory Reading

All Welcome