Tag Archives: Law

READING GROUP: ‘INTERPRETING LITERATURE, LAW, AND CONSTITUTION’ (VI)

Tuesday 19 April, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History

All welcome.

This session will be led by Professors Lorna Hutson and John Hudson, Directors of CMEMLL.

There will be no reading in preparation for this session since it is intended both to follow on from the CMEMLL Annual Lecture to be given by Steve White and Gadi Algazi, and to draw together the year’s conversations around ‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution.’

 

 

READING GROUP: ‘INTERPRETING LITERATURE, LAW, AND CONSTITUTION’ (V)

Tuesday 8 March, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History

 

READING GROUP: ‘INTERPRETING LITERATURE, LAW, AND CONSTITUTION’ (IV)

Tuesday 16 February, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History

All welcome.

This session will be led by Professor Anthony Lang, Director of the Centre for Global Constitutionalism.

Reading:

Anthony F. Lang, Jr. Between International Law in The City & The City and Embassytown. In China Miéville: Critical Essays, ed. Caroline Edwards and Tony Venezia (Canterbury: Gylphi, 2015), pp. 213-238.

Miéville, China. ‘Editorial Introduction.’ Marxism and Fantasy [Special Issue]. Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory, 10.4 (2002), pp. 39–49.

 

University of Cambridge: Maitland Studentship in Legal History

This studentship in Legal History, which can include Law and Literature, might be of interest to junior members of CMEMLL or to the students of members.

The Managers of the F.W. Maitland Memorial Fund are able to offer one maintenance-only Studentship for Home/EU, or Overseas/Islands students applying to undertake doctoral research in legal history at the University of Cambridge, starting in October 2016. Studentships are tenable in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of History, or the Faculty of English.

Applications will be accepted from students applying directly to read for the PhD degree only. Studentships are tenable for up to three years. Continued tenure of the Studentship will be subject to satisfactory academic progress, and to the meeting of any other conditions set by the University for continuation of study. In making decisions on the award or continuation of studentships, the Managers will take into account funding available from other sources.

The maximum annual value of the Studentship will be the University of Cambridge’s minimum maintenance requirement for PhD students, which for the academic year 2015-16 is £12750. Candidates wishing to be considered for this Studentship should complete the studentship application form and send it directly to Mrs Alison Hirst, University of Cambridge, Faculty of Law, 10 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DZ or by email to phdadmissions@law.cam.ac.uk by 30 January 2016. Candidates should also apply for admission as a graduate student by the relevant PhD course closing date in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of History or the Faculty of English.

 

Reading Group: ‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution’ (ii)

Tuesday 17 November, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History

All welcome.

“When, in the early modern period, “the waves ruled Britannia”, the examples of Greek maritime empire became standards against which British rights and obligations in the world could be measured”     (Christopher Warren)

In our second reading group this semester we will be exploring the ‘international thought’ of Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) in the context of his translation of Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War.

Did Hobbes simply ’translate’ Thucydides (c.460-400BCE) from Greek into English, or was he also reshaping and restating Thucydidean ideas for an early modern audience? Why was Hobbes interested in the ancient Athenian constitution, the ‘way of life of the citizen-body’ and how did he relate this to Athenian imperialism? If we read Hobbes’ translation of Thucydides as ‘literature’, how might this challenge our understanding of Hobbes as a ‘realist’ or a ‘rationalist’, in terms of subsequent international relations theory? Can Thucydides, moreover, help us to unravel ‘the peculiar nature’ of Hobbes’ thought on natural law and the law of nations?

Reading:

Christopher N. Warren, Literature and the Law of Nations, 1580-1680 (Oxford, 2015). Chapter 5, “From Imperial History to International Law” [St Andrews University Library Ebook]

Handout

Further reading:

Malcolm, N., Aspects of Hobbes (Oxford, 2002), Chapter 13 “Hobbes’ Theory of International Relations” [St Andrews University Library Ebook]

Boucher, David, ‘Hobbes’s Contribution to International Thought, and the Contribution of International Thought to Hobbes,’ in History of European Ideas 41:1 (2015), pp. 29-48.