Tag Archives: Legal History

CMEMLL Reading Group: Futures of Law and Literature (II)

Monday 12 December, 4.00 – 5.00 pm
Syndicate Room, Wolfson College, University of Cambridge

The Reading Group will involve a brief introduction by Rachel Holmes and Andrew Zurcher followed by discussion on the theme of ‘Futures of Law and Literature’. Previous attendance at the CMEMLL Reading Group is not requisite to participation.

The background reading for our discussion comprises the following:

Grant Williams, ‘Law and the Production of Literature: An Introductory Perspective.’ In Donald Beecher et al, ed., Taking Exception to the Law: Materializing Injustice in Early Modern English Literature (University of Toronto Press, 2015), pp. 3–43.

 

CMEMLL Research Seminar: Hannah Worthen (Leicester/The National Archives)

Wednesday 30 November, 12.00 – 13.30 pm
GR03, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge

‘‘For the hazards of War are equall’: The Narratives of Royalist Widows in Print, Petitions and at Law during the Civil Wars’

Abstract

The infamous 1649 publication, Eikon Basilike, professed to be authored by Charles I, asked ‘what Widdowes or Orphans tears can witnesse against me, the just cry of which must now be avenged with My own bloud? For the hazards of War are equall, nor doth the Cannon know any respect of Persons’. The Civil Wars of 1642-1649 were brutal, and there had been a clamour to avenge the blood of the fallen with the execution of the King who was deemed by many to be responsible. Depictions of widows became part of the political discourse surrounding the wars: the desolate and suffering widows who epitomised the losses of England as well as the deviant widows who stepped beyond customary boundaries during those turbulent times.

During the Civil Wars and Interregnum Parliament seized the lands of Royalists in order to fund their war effort. Consequently, many widows who had been deemed to be ‘delinquent’ turned to petitions and the legal process in order to protect their family’s landed interests. These women had lost husbands and sons to the war but were not viewed as blameless victims by the Parliamentarian authorities. This paper will examine the petitions and legal challenges submitted by these Royalist widows and look to the ways in which they described their suffering and, therefore, drew upon wider narratives of the losses of widows during this period.

The discussion will examine the intersection between legal texts, petitions and print discourse in order to analyse the experience of Royalist widows who sought to defend their lands. By drawing upon narratives of loss, poverty and the universal suffering of war time, many of these widows were able to successfully navigate political and legal processes and regain the property and status that the wars had cost them.

Organised jointly with the Early Modern Interdisciplinary Seminar.


Hannah Worthen is a final-year PhD student researching at The University of Leicester in collaboration with The National Archives.

CMEMLL Reading Group: Futures of Law and Literature (i)

Monday 24 October, 4.00 – 5.00 pm
Erasmus Room, Queens’ College, University of Cambridge

This year the St Andrews Centre for Mediaeval and Early Modern Law and Literature (CMEMLL) becomes a collaborative forum between St Andrews, Oxford, and Cambridge, with Law and Literature events continuing at St Andrews under the auspices of the Institute for Legal and Constitutional Research.

This year’s theme is ‘Futures of Law and Literature’. The full schedule of these sessions and other CMEMLL events can be found here:

http://cmemll.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/events/201617-2/.

The Reading Group will involve a brief introduction by Rachel Holmes and Andrew Zurcher followed by discussion on the theme of ‘Futures of Law and Literature’.

The background reading for our discussion comprises the following two articles:

Bernadette Meyler, ‘Law, Literature, and History: The Love Triangle.’ UC Irvine Law Review 365 (2015).

Greta Olson, ‘Futures of Law and Literature: A Preliminary Overview from a Culturalist Perspective.’ Law and Literature In-Between: Contemporary Inter- and Transdisciplinary Approaches, ed. Christian Hiebaum, Susanne Knaller, Doris Pichler (Bielefeld: transcript, 2015. 37-69).

CMEMLL/ILCR Round Table: Law and Drama in Early Modern England

Capture1-4 pm, 5 May, 2016 
Kennedy Hall, School of English, The Scores 

Round Table Speakers

Quentin Skinner, Barber Beaumont Professor of the Humanities, Queen Mary, University of London, author of Forensic Shakespeare (2014)
Andrew Zurcher, Queens College, Cambridge, author of Shakespeare and Law (2010)
Lorna Hutson, St Andrews, author of The Invention of Suspicion (2007) and Circumstantial Shakespeare (2015)

Schedule

1 pm – catered lunch in the Stephen Boyd Room
2-4 pm – Round Table Discussion in the Lawson Room 

Preparatory Reading

All Welcome

 

READING GROUP: ‘INTERPRETING LITERATURE, LAW, AND CONSTITUTION’ (VI)

Tuesday 19 April, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History

All welcome.

This session will be led by Professors Lorna Hutson and John Hudson, Directors of CMEMLL.

There will be no reading in preparation for this session since it is intended both to follow on from the CMEMLL Annual Lecture to be given by Steve White and Gadi Algazi, and to draw together the year’s conversations around ‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution.’