Tag Archives: Legal History

CMEMLL/ILCR Annual Lecture: Steve White (Emory) & Gadi Algazi (Tel Aviv)

‘Boy meets Gift: or, The Uses of Literature’

Monday 18 April, 5.15 – 7.00 pm
Parliament Hall, South Street

This lecture, given collaboratively by Professor Stephen D. White (Emory) and Professor Gadi Algazi (Tel Aviv) is a joint venture of CMEMLL and the Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research. This year, the CMEMLL Annual Lecture is also the ILCR Annual Academic Lecture.

A wine reception will follow the event.

All welcome.


Stephen D. White is Asa G. Candler Professor Emeritus of Medieval History at Emory University.

He is author of Custom, Kinship, and Gifts to Saints: the Laudatio Parentum in Western France, 1050-1150Sir Edward Coke and the Grievances of the Commonwealth, 1621-1628Feuding and Peacemaking in Eleventh-Century France; and Re-Thinking Kinship and Feudalism in Early Medieval Europe.

He is currently completing a collection of essays on treason, vengeance and feuding in eleventh- and twelfth-century France and England; and a book manuscript provisionally entitled, ‘Bad Kings, Felonious Barons, and Unfaithful Ladies: The Representation of Treason Trials in Old French Literature, c.1150 to c.1240.’


Gadi Algazi is Professor of History at the Department of History, Tel Aviv University, and senior editor of the journal History & Memory. He is also member of the editorial board of the journals Past & Present and Historische Anthropologie.

He is author of Herrengewalt und Gewalt der Herren im späten Mittelalter: Herrschaft, Gegenseitigkeit und Sprachgebrauch [Historische Studien, vol. 17] (Frankfurt am Main/New York: Campus, 1996) [Seigniorial Power and Violence in the Later Middle Ages: Lordship, Reciprocity and Language Use] and, with Valentin Groebner and Bernhard Jussen, he coedited Negotiating the Gift: Pre-Modern Figurations of Exchange (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2003).

He is currently completing a book on the shaping of scholars’ way of life and habitus between 1480 and 1630.

READING GROUP: ‘INTERPRETING LITERATURE, LAW, AND CONSTITUTION’ (V)

Tuesday 8 March, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History

 

READING GROUP: ‘INTERPRETING LITERATURE, LAW, AND CONSTITUTION’ (IV)

Tuesday 16 February, 1.00 – 2.00 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History

All welcome.

This session will be led by Professor Anthony Lang, Director of the Centre for Global Constitutionalism.

Reading:

Anthony F. Lang, Jr. Between International Law in The City & The City and Embassytown. In China Miéville: Critical Essays, ed. Caroline Edwards and Tony Venezia (Canterbury: Gylphi, 2015), pp. 213-238.

Miéville, China. ‘Editorial Introduction.’ Marxism and Fantasy [Special Issue]. Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory, 10.4 (2002), pp. 39–49.

 

Law & Society in Early Modern England: A Conference in Memory of Chris Brooks (Durham University)

19 March 2016, 10:00
Pemberton Building, Palace Green, Durham University

 

This conference brings together friends and colleagues of Chris to celebrate his contribution to early modern history, and to reflect on the important issues in legal history and social history which his work illuminated. The conference focuses on asking and answering questions about the role of the law in early modern English society and culture from the perspective of legal history and social history – the two fields which his scholarship investigated.

Click here to view the full programme.

Chris Brooks was a leading scholar of the English common law and the role of law in early modern English politics and society. In a series of works, Brooks demonstrated the extensive role of the law in the lives not only of the wealthy and politically powerful, but also in commercial, craft and farming households, and in the lives of servants and the poor. Chris also contributed to the paradigm shift whereby English society was no longer regarded as split between the elite and the rest, but as possessing a significant ‘middling sort’, encompassing both the upper middling sort professionals who practised the law and the commercial households with craft and farming enterprises who relied on the law to enforce contract and acquire credit.

Christopher W. Brooks was Professor of History at Durham University until his death in August 2014, shortly before his retirement.

As you know, Chris gave a characteristically fabulous and thought-provoking CMEMLL Annual Lecture in October 2013.


Please note that places for this event will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. to book your place contact Kelly Guy at admin.imems@durham.ac.uk

Organised by Durham University’s Institute for Medieval and Early Modern Studies. We are grateful for the support of Durham University History Department, Joanna Barker, the Selden Society and the Huntington Library.

Contact admin.imems@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

Download this event in iCalendar format

 

CMEMLL Annual Report 2014/15

CMEMLL Annual Report 2015/16

We are pleased to share a report of CMEMLL’s activities for the academic year 2014/15 here.

As you can see, we were rather busy last year with three conferences, a regular programme of reading groups and research events, and the inauguration of the new Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research.

We are half-way through our programme for 2015/16 with a great deal to look forward to in second semester.

See the programme of events and the Annual Report for further details.