Tag Archives: Maitland

University of Cambridge: Maitland Studentship in Legal History

This studentship in Legal History, which can include Law and Literature, might be of interest to junior members of CMEMLL or to the students of members.

The Managers of the F.W. Maitland Memorial Fund are able to offer one maintenance-only Studentship for Home/EU, or Overseas/Islands students applying to undertake doctoral research in legal history at the University of Cambridge, starting in October 2016. Studentships are tenable in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of History, or the Faculty of English.

Applications will be accepted from students applying directly to read for the PhD degree only. Studentships are tenable for up to three years. Continued tenure of the Studentship will be subject to satisfactory academic progress, and to the meeting of any other conditions set by the University for continuation of study. In making decisions on the award or continuation of studentships, the Managers will take into account funding available from other sources.

The maximum annual value of the Studentship will be the University of Cambridge’s minimum maintenance requirement for PhD students, which for the academic year 2015-16 is £12750. Candidates wishing to be considered for this Studentship should complete the studentship application form and send it directly to Mrs Alison Hirst, University of Cambridge, Faculty of Law, 10 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DZ or by email to phdadmissions@law.cam.ac.uk by 30 January 2016. Candidates should also apply for admission as a graduate student by the relevant PhD course closing date in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of History or the Faculty of English.

 

Reading Group: Professor David M. Rabban (University of Texas at Austin)

Tuesday 29 April, 2014, 1-2 pm
New Seminar Room, St John’s House, 65 South Street, School of History

David M. Rabban, the Dahr Jamail, Randall Hage Jamail and Robert Lee Jamail Regents Chair and Professor of Law at the University of Texas at Austin, author of Law’s History: American Legal Thought and the Transatlantic Turn to History (on American legal historians and medievalism), will lead a reading group on Maitland.  The reading for this session is Chapter XII of David Rabban’s book, Law’s History:

Rabban, David M., ‘Maitland: The Maturity of English Legal History,’ in Law’s History: American Legal Thought and the Transatlantic Turn to History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), pp. 383-422.

Rabban plans to touch briefly on the relationship between Maitland and the American legal historians in his talk on Monday, but wishes to discuss Maitland more broadly and in more detail in the reading group.


Professor Rabban’s research focuses on labor law, higher education and the law, and American legal history. He is best known for his path-breaking work on free speech in American history. He is the author of Free Speech in Its Forgotten Years, 1870-1920 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,1997), which received the Forkosch Prize from the Journal of the History of Ideas for “the best book in intellectual history published in 1997”. His many articles have appeared in Yale Law JournalStanford Law ReviewUniversity of Chicago Law Review, and elsewhere.

 

Research Seminar: Professor David M. Rabban (University of Texas at Austin)

‘Making Law Scientific: The Founding Generation of American Legal Scholars on Mediaeval English Law’

Monday 28 April, 2014, 5.15 pm
Old Class Library, St John’s House, 65 South Street, School of History

David M. Rabban, the Dahr Jamail, Randall Hage Jamail and Robert Lee Jamail Regents Chair and Professor of Law at the University of Texas at Austin, author of Law’s History: American Legal Thought and the Transatlantic Turn to History (on American legal historians and medievalism), will give a paper entitled ‘Making Law Scientific: The Founding Generation of American Legal Scholars on Mediaeval English Law.’


Professor Rabban’s research focuses on labor law, higher education and the law, and American legal history. He is best known for his path-breaking work on free speech in American history. He is the author of Free Speech in Its Forgotten Years, 1870-1920 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,1997), which received the Forkosch Prize from the Journal of the History of Ideas for “the best book in intellectual history published in 1997”. His many articles have appeared in Yale Law JournalStanford Law ReviewUniversity of Chicago Law Review, and elsewhere.

 

Reading Group: Professor Warren Brown (California Institute of Technology)

Thursday 18 April, 2013, 1-2 pm
Stephen Boyd Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English

Warren Brown, Professor of History at the California Institute of Technology and Donald Bullough Fellow at the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, will lead a reading group on Jennifer Jahner’s ‘Motives and Motifs in Early English Law: Reading the Mirror of Justices after Maitland’. This is an unpublished work-in-progress, and a copy of the text can be found here.


Professor Brown’s research interests are in the social history of mediaeval Europe, in conflict resolution and social and institutional memory. He is the author, most recently, of Violence in Medieval Europe (London: Longman Press, 2011), and, as editor, of Documentary Culture and the Laity in the Early Middle Ages (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013). At St Andrews he will be completing research on a new monograph, provisionally titled World in a Book: Lay Society in Early Medieval Europe.